Carbon Monoxide Myths Debunked

Believing false carbon monoxide myths can be extremely dangerous. Carbon monoxide is very often misunderstood. There are lots of carbon monoxide myths that are being passed on from one person to the next. What’s dangerous about this is that carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the top causes of accidental poisoning and wrong information can lead to hospitalization or even death. Here are some carbon monoxide myths debunked: MYTH: You could smell carbon monoxide when you turn on your boiler. FACT: This gas is odorless, colorless and tasteless, hence the nickname ‘silent killer’. What you are likely smelling are combustion byproducts which should also be addressed right away. MYTH: Carbon monoxide problems are caused by old heating systems. FACT: Yes, old HVAC units including air conditioners and boilers that are not functioning properly can emit carbon monoxide. However, this is not the only cause. Carbon monoxide also build up when your heating system is not vented properly or the air in your home does not circulate well, like when you have clogged up chimneys. Pain remover chemicals can also cause CO poisoning. MYTH: Heating systems must be checked every two to three years to make sure they are properly functioning. FACT: A boiler service must be done annually. MYTH: Carbon monoxide is not too dangerous. FACT: Carbon monoxide kills more than 500 people in the US annually from unintentional poisoning and is the most common type of fatal indoor air poisoning anywhere. MYTH: People who have inhaled the gas in poisonous levels do not show physical symptoms. FACT: Carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms include nausea, headache, burning eyes, confusion, drowsiness, and loss...

Gas Safety Tips

Learn a few gas safety tips for using and maintaining your home appliances.   We all rely on our gas appliances to perform everyday chores – cook, do the dishes, do the laundry, etc – and to keep us warm. While gas appliances are very useful, improper installation, maintenance and use can cause serious safety and health threats to you and your  family.   Gas Safety Tips Here are some gas safety tips for your home: General Safety Tips: Natural gas leak smells like rotten eggs. If you suddenly smell gas, exit your home immediately and call your local fire department from a neighbor’s home or your mobile. Fuel- burning appliances and equipment require adequate ventilation and must be vented outdoors. Make sure not to block the appliances with piles of boxes, other furniture, walls, curtains, etc that can interfere with proper airflow from the appliance. Keep kids away from gas appliances. Never use gas appliances (such as your gas dryer or power washer) to heat the home. Use your home appliances only for their intended functions. Use a qualified contractor and a gas safe registered engineer to do any work on your gas appliances. Schedule your boiler service and maintenance check on your other gas appliances annually. Install a carbon monoxide detector. Make sure the device is installed correctly, tested regularly and maintained properly. Do not store combustibles such as mops or paper near your gas appliances. Do not use and store flammable products near your gas appliances. Educate your family, or anyone living in your home, about emergency procedures. Ensure that everyone knows what emergency number(s) to...

When to Replace a Carbon Monoxide Detector

Learn more about when to replace a carbon monoxide detector to make sure it is always in good working condition.   When to Replace a Carbon Monoxide Detector Carbon monoxide is a type of gas that is colorless and odorless, and can be very poisonous. Carbon monoxide is produced when carbon- based fuel is not completely burned. Outside, the carbon monoxide in the air can get dispersed easily. However, malfunctioning appliances that use gas fuel also emit carbon monoxide. This includes common home appliances such as HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) units, ovens, ranges, dryers and washers. A carbon monoxide detector installed in your home will warn you if there is carbon monoxide present in the air. This helps provide security to you and your family, and allows you time to exit your home or the building before the carbon monoxide reaches poisonous levels. However, carbon monoxide detectors do not last forever. For starters, those that are battery- operated will need new batteries. So when to replace a carbon monoxide detector? When this alarm was first introduced in the market, the early models had a lifespan of 2 years. With the advancement in technology, new models now offer a longer lifespan. Many manufacturers advertise their carbon monoxide detectors to last up to 5 to 7 years. Most units will have a display that will tell you when to replace a carbon monoxide detector. However, if the unit is not functioning properly, replace it even before its expiration date. Check the manufacturer’s manual and review the information about the expiration date. The batteries used in your carbon monoxide detector will...

Buying a Carbon Monoxide Detector

Are you planning on buying a carbon monoxide detector? We have some tips to make that easier for you.   Carbon Monoxide Detector Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless and tasteless gas that can be very poisonous. CO is produced by some home and commercial gas appliances, such as heating, ventilation and air conditioning, gas ranges and power washers, that are not properly installed and maintained. A carbon monoxide detector can be installed in your home to detect the presence of CO in your home. Take note that a smoke detector installed in your home will only detect smoke from flames or fire, where as a smoke detector will warn you if there is CO coming from malfunctioning gas-burning appliances.   Buying a Carbon Monoxide Detector Buying a carbon monoxide detector can save your life, and your family’s. Here are some tips if you are planning to get one. Carbon monoxide detectors vary in features. Here’s what you should look for: Audio alarm. Choose a detector that features an alarm. Most certified CO detectors have a horn with at least 85 decibels. This can be heard within 10 feet. Inter- connectivity. If you have a large home, it is best to buy several detectors. Interconnecting units have the ability to communicate with one another so that if one unit detects CO, it triggers all the units to sound an alarm. Lifespan sensor. Carbon monoxide detectors wear overtime. Choose one that has an “end of life” warning so that you know when to replace it. Some models also have a low battery alert feature. Warranty. Your CO detector can malfunction,...

Carbon Monoxide

Here’s the need-to-know on the deadly carbon monoxide What is carbon monoxide? Carbon monoxide or CO is a colorless, odorless and tasteless gas. It is slightly denser than air and can be poisonous. It can easily mix with other gasses that you inhale and you will not be able to detect that you are inhaling carbon monoxide. How is it produced? CO is a result of the incomplete burning or carbon- based fuel such as natural gas, gasoline, kerosene, oil, propane, coal and wood. Some home and commercial appliances that are powered by internal combustion engines such as heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) units, portable generators, cars, lawn mowers, and power washers. These machines and carbon- based fuels are safe to use. However, when the fuel does not burn properly, excess CO is produced and this can be poisonous. Gas appliances that are incorrectly installed and maintain can cause CO to leak in high levels. How does it harm you? Carbon monoxide is harmful when inhaled because it displaces oxygen in the blood and prevents oxygen from being supplied to the heart, brain and other vital organs. CO in large amounts can overcome a person in minutes with no warning. It can cause the person to lose consciousness and suffocate. How many people are affected by carbon monoxide poisoning? Every year, more than 200 people in the UK are taken to hospitals on suspected poisoning from CO. Of this number, there are about 40 deaths reported annually from CO poisoning. What are the symptoms? Initial symptoms when a moderate amount of CO enters one’s body include: Headache Fatigue Shortness of breath...

Concealed Boiler Flues

Concealed boiler flues pose a health hazard to your family Boiler flues are necessary components of a gas heating system. They are responsible for taking away fumes from the boiler. There are properties, mostly flats and apartments, that have concealed boiler flues which are difficult to inspect because they are placed behind walls and ceilings.  It has been shown that a number of incident where carbon monoxide from faulty boiler are seeping into rooms due to faulty concealed flues.   Concealed boiler flues should be examined by Gas Safe registered engineers Gas Safe registered engineers should be able to inspect the boiler flues whenever a safety check is done on your gas heating system. Flues that are in poor condition, coupled with a boiler situated in a room with poor ventilation, will definitely increase the potential danger that your family will face in relation to carbon monoxide poisoning. While carbon monoxide alarms can be installed to monitor the room, it is an an alternative to a Gas Safe registered engineer being able to visually inspect the boiler flues. Only them can ensure and certify that your gas boiler system is fit and safe for your family. What to do if you have concealed boiler flues If your property have concealed boiler flues, then inspection hatches that follows regulations should be installed. They should be 1-hour-fire rated and place 1.5 metres from a flue joint. This will facilitate easier inspections for your gas boiler heating system. A reliable Gas Safe engineer should inform you about the risks of concealed boiler flues and give you advise on inspection hatches. If the...
*

Like Us on Facebook

*

Follow Us on Twitter